Damn Good Advice: SIXTEEN

There is nothing very overt about the provocative nature of my photographs. Often, they are beautiful moments of color, line, form, and texture. I do find, though, as I continue to submit work and meet other artists and converse with gallery folk that my work isn’t Photography with a capital P. It’s unexpected in some ways because it’s not how most people would use a camera. For example, these tidal lines are rather unassuming perhaps, but I see a delicacy worthy of framing. But, no, you say, it’s pedestrian at best– lacks varying qualities of color, depth of field, and these five other technical aspects of a Photograph.

Tide Lines © 2014 NATE METZ

This is my brand, my photography. I’m not overly intricate or technical in my approach, although my perfectionism may ask me to lean that way at times. I challenge your classic and traditional view of photography, and that’s my style of provocation. I do not accept any established definition of what art should be. I own my expression fully. These prints are for sale because they are worth money and would look great hanging on your wall or even a 4×6 on your desk. If you already know me, then this diatribe is not news. If you’re new to Nate World, now you know!

Needless to say, I do already embrace this Damn Good Advice and follow it unconsciously. Being a cultural provocateur is an archetype repeated throughout many areas of my life. It isn’t easy and I don’t know that I would pick it out for myself if I had a deck to choose from because it is an ongoing challenge. It requires great strength and courage to think freely and remain centered so that I can continue to honor the pure place of my creativity. I’m glad seasoned creators like Lois can ask younger generations to continue to push boundaries and reinvent the art world.

An Unexpected Surprise © 2014 NATE METZ

Cape Henlopen – Tidal Patterns

The bay side of the park always reveals beautiful patterns with the changing tides. This day, the overcast skies helped diffuse the mid-day sun and really highlight these patterns.

As always, you can get an 8×10 $20, 11×14 $45, but also available in custom sizes like the square crops I post here! Please post a comment or send me an e-mail if you would like prints. I appreciate your continued support as an artist!

Cape Henlopen – Pine Dunes

A cursory glance through the dunes at the park can seem dull and drab: browns, grays, muted greens. Because I had all afternoon, I slowed my walk down into a meditative state so I could really experience the sights around me. The longer I lingered the more I saw and the more diversity my lens found.

As always, you can get an 8×10 $20, 11×14 $45, but also available in custom sizes like the square crops I post here! Please post a comment or send me an e-mail if you would like prints.

Cape Henlopen – Snow & Ice!

Somehow snow on the beach seems contradictory, smashing the idea summer fun with the harshness of winter. During the winter months, before migratory birds occupy the cape, the state park opens the outermost portion of Cape Henlopen Beach to foot traffic. On this particularly warm, sunny afternoon I captured some glimpses of nature’s elegant paradox between the snow and the sand. The patterns formed appear random, but a closer molecular study would show complex engineering of ice crystal formation. The delicate intricacies of the snow and ice slowly melting remind me of the beauty in the down cycle of life processes. The gentle shift of late winter to early spring speaks of patience and life reemerging.

Please post a comment or send me an e-mail if you would like prints. As always, you can get an 8×10 $20, 11×14 $45, but also available in custom sizes like the square crops I post here!

If you are already following my work, you’ll recognize one of these images as Beach Melts from the NAA “In the Abstract” exhibit in March.

Cape Henlopen

The Cape Henlopen State Park is one of my favorite places to hike and take photographs. Forests and mountains definitely feel like home to me, but I’m learning to enjoy the coastal landscape. The next couple posts are a series of photographs taken from late winter, early spring. Please post a comment or send me an e-mail if you would like prints. As always, you can get an 8×10 $20, 11×14 $45, but also available in custom sizes like the square crops I post here!

Late Spring

A nice hike led me along these frames this late spring:

Tiffany’s Glass

In addition to the “arctic” lake, I stumbled upon the Willard Chapel on a local tourism site. As I read the blurb, I knew I just absolutely had to go see the splendor!

“The Willard Chapel is an extremely rare example of the work of Louis C. Tiffany and Tiffany Glass and Decoration Co. Included in the Tiffany interior are 14 opalescent windows, a rose window, a large figure window, nine Mooresque styled chandeliers, memorial tablets of glass mosaic tile and gilt bronze, furnishings of oak inlaid with metal and glass mosaic, a ceiling with gold leaf stencils and mosaic flooring. Built in 1892-1894, the interior of the Chapel was designed and handcrafted entirely by Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company of New York City and is the only complete and unaltered Tiffany designed religion interior known to exist in the world.”
from http://www.willardchapel.org

We got a private tour of the chapel that last about an hour. It really felt like an episode on National Geographic as we got history of the building and explored techniques and design elements of Tiffany’s glass and other furnishings. The greatest part was definitely the ability to use flash photography! I can understanding some art museums and not allowing flash photography, but any that ban all types of photography are just no fun! I have a couple wide angle shots of the chapel, but these are just the detail shots. I’d recommend seeing the official page for more. And, if you are ever in the Finger Lake region of New York, it is worth the trip downtown Auburn to see this work in person!

Pemberton EDIT

I recently submitted work, while not selected for exhibition, that I still want to share. You may remember last year I posted photos from the Pemberton Tract of the Nature Conservancy. Here is a set of black and white conversions that you may recognize a processing technique I am working on. I think the images in the high contrast black and white really create greater impact for the pine tree in winter!

prints available upon request © 2014 NATE METZ
8×10 $20, 11×14 $45, custom sizes also available

Skaneateles Lake

The below freezing temperatures were not conducive to photo-taking around the lake. As you can see, it was frozen over quite a ways out and the cloud of mist marked the end of the ice. Warm (er) water was able to evaporate and the microclimate at the water level made the clouds. It was very beautiful!

I believe this is the coldest weather I have used my dSLR, so I was very cautious to keep it in the bag to reduce exposure times to the brutest cold. And also to protect the battery and prevent condensation inside the lens! After walking about 20 minutes in one direction, my feet started to get cold and it was time to come back. Next time snow boots are definitely in order!

The other two photos are straight forward–I love looking at the blue sky through branches!

Skaneateles Lake, NY © 2014 NATE METZ