Late Spring

A nice hike led me along these frames this late spring:

Tiffany’s Glass

In addition to the “arctic” lake, I stumbled upon the Willard Chapel on a local tourism site. As I read the blurb, I knew I just absolutely had to go see the splendor!

“The Willard Chapel is an extremely rare example of the work of Louis C. Tiffany and Tiffany Glass and Decoration Co. Included in the Tiffany interior are 14 opalescent windows, a rose window, a large figure window, nine Mooresque styled chandeliers, memorial tablets of glass mosaic tile and gilt bronze, furnishings of oak inlaid with metal and glass mosaic, a ceiling with gold leaf stencils and mosaic flooring. Built in 1892-1894, the interior of the Chapel was designed and handcrafted entirely by Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company of New York City and is the only complete and unaltered Tiffany designed religion interior known to exist in the world.”

We got a private tour of the chapel that last about an hour. It really felt like an episode on National Geographic as we got history of the building and explored techniques and design elements of Tiffany’s glass and other furnishings. The greatest part was definitely the ability to use flash photography! I can understanding some art museums and not allowing flash photography, but any that ban all types of photography are just no fun! I have a couple wide angle shots of the chapel, but these are just the detail shots. I’d recommend seeing the official page for more. And, if you are ever in the Finger Lake region of New York, it is worth the trip downtown Auburn to see this work in person!

Pemberton EDIT

I recently submitted work, while not selected for exhibition, that I still want to share. You may remember last year I posted photos from the Pemberton Tract of the Nature Conservancy. Here is a set of black and white conversions that you may recognize a processing technique I am working on. I think the images in the high contrast black and white really create greater impact for the pine tree in winter!

prints available upon request © 2014 NATE METZ
8×10 $20, 11×14 $45, custom sizes also available

Skaneateles Lake

The below freezing temperatures were not conducive to photo-taking around the lake. As you can see, it was frozen over quite a ways out and the cloud of mist marked the end of the ice. Warm (er) water was able to evaporate and the microclimate at the water level made the clouds. It was very beautiful!

I believe this is the coldest weather I have used my dSLR, so I was very cautious to keep it in the bag to reduce exposure times to the brutest cold. And also to protect the battery and prevent condensation inside the lens! After walking about 20 minutes in one direction, my feet started to get cold and it was time to come back. Next time snow boots are definitely in order!

The other two photos are straight forward–I love looking at the blue sky through branches!

Skaneateles Lake, NY © 2014 NATE METZ

In hindsight…

I don’t often post archive photos, but I thought it would be nice to share some of my favorite images of the holidays.

Hustle and Bustle © 2003 NATE METZ
A long shutter on the tree.

Snowy Woods © 2003 NATE METZ
When I got my first digital camera for Christmas in 2002, we got snow by January that I was able to capture these woods behind the house.

Red Valentino © 2004 NATE METZ
These red flowers on a Valentino gown in a Parisian window remind me of poinsettias.

December White Lilies © 2006 NATE METZ
Sometimes tropical flowers break up the winter blues!

The Center of my World in © 2007 NATE METZ
Manhattan by plane one winter night.

Snowy Pines with Blue © 2009
With my second digital camera, I had learned a few more skills and handled the WB better still.

Snowy Hollies © 2003
The state tree in a very uncharacteristic state.



These photographs were all the “rejects” that I did not select for entry in the challenge. I opted for this image of a mushroom because I believe it is much more impactful for the theme of OPPOSITES.


rank = 16th
1/125 sec, f8, ISO 200

I opted for a simple set of opposites shared in a single subject where the frame would highlight the differences. The closeness and color conversion really emphasize the theme. I received some great feedback on how the frame seems top heavy and that the top portion out of focus might have looked better as the smaller 1/3 of the frame. However, I like it as is because in the competition for your eye, it really pushes the oppositional tension between the top of the mushroom and the underside.


I recently had the pleasure of visiting and documenting a local farm that grows produce for several restaurants at the beach. While I prefer not to shoot in the middle of the day, I was able to tweak the settings on my camera to handle the harsh lighting and successfully document the fields and high tunnel. It is a little different style of shooting for me to do. I’m used to capturing subjects in unique and interesting ways, but my ways might distract the growers from their job. All of the images I captured are to be used in the record keeping and to plan for next year’s crops: sequencing, row spacing, and so forth. I definitely would like to go back periodically and have good product images of the produce grown that they would be able to use for marketing.

I really enjoyed my time out in nature surrounded by the life and abundance. It feels magical around so much thriving greenery. The energy really uplifts and revitalizes my own life force. Can you feel the love?

Delaware Scene – Nate Metz Solo Show

I can hardly believe that it’s happing next week! My debut exhibit is finally about to happen. I think back on the number of hours I’ve spent with my camera and Photoshop and how long I didn’t do anything about it. I’m so grateful that my work is enjoyed by so many people! In preparation for the showing, I’ve gotten some press about the exhibit. Here is a nice write-up on Delaware Scene:

It is free to attend opening night, June 7th from 6-8PM, so bring a friend and see the work up close!

The show consists of 25 street photographs and includes selections from my yellow study.

# art exhibit Delaware

Magnolia Dream

Bored one afternoon this spring, I pulled out my 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED IF AF-S DX VR that I haven’t used since I first bought it 5+ (?!) years ago to test it out. I thought, erroneously, that it would only be good when out scouting birds or taking tourist type shots that I could zoom up onto monuments and so forth. And that is precisely why I hadn’t been using it, focusing instead on my prime lens to capture a nice bokeh and shallow DOF for my translucent light studies. I have had a lot of micromovements in some of my throwaways, so I decided to play with the VR by standing 7-10 feet away. These are the shots I came up with:

Magnolia Dream © 2013 NATE METZ